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2001 General Election

The Report of the Chief Electoral Officer on the 2000 Provincial Confirmation Process and Monday, March 12, 2001 Provincial General Election of the Twenty-fifth Legislative Assembly.Click on the following parts to download the full report in PDF. Please be advised that the following pdf files are fairly large due to the amount of maps contained in the report. You may also request a hard copy by contacting our Office.

Part 1 (316 kb) Part 7 (1.42 mb) Part 13 (1.91 mb) Part 19 (2.58 mb)
Part 2 (324 kb) Part 8 (1.27 mb) Part 14 (2.50 mb) Part 20 (3.73 mb)
Part 3 (655 kb) Part 9 (2.50 mb) Part 15 (2.37 mb) Part 21 (4.56 mb)
Part 4 (3.79 mb) Part 10 (2.97 mb) Part 16 (1.99 mb) Part 22 (3.51 mb)
Part 5 (1.08 mb) Part 11 (3.02 mb) Part 17 (3.88 mb) Part 23 (2.91 mb)
Part 6 (1.49 mb) Part 12 (2.30 mb) Part 18 (2.99 mb) Part 24 (2.84 mb)

Click to download List of Members elected to the 25th Legislative Assembly (MLA) Click to download the 2001 Financial Addendum

Overview
Election Training
Mapping Resources
Elector Information
Election Calendar
Legislative and Procedural Changes
Nominated Candidates
Special Ballot Polls
Advance Polls
Mobile Polls
Polling Day
Additions to the Lists of Electors
Accuracy of the Lists of Electors Table 1
Official Results
Publication
Custody and Inspection of Election Documents
Continuous Register of Electors Management
Candidates’ Deposits
Campaign Period Financial Statements
Remarks of the Chief Electoral Officer
Members Elected to the Twenty-fifth Legislative Assembly
List of Returning Officers (Confirmation & General Election)
Voter Turnout Summary
Summary of Results by Electoral Divisions

Overview…. The election was conducted on the electoral divisions established by the Electoral Divisions Act. The boundaries were established based on the recommendations of the 1995/1996 Alberta Electoral Boundaries Commission. Returning Officers were appointed by Order in Council for the purpose of or in connection with elections, enumerations, and plebiscites under the Election Act. Order in Council 87/2001 dissolved the Twenty-fourth Legislative Assembly of Alberta on February 12, 2001, and ordered the Chief Electoral Officer to issue Writs of Election to each of the eighty-three Returning Officers, pursuant to Section 37 of the Election Act.

Election Training…. Returning Officers and Election Clerks received training to prepare them for their responsibilities. They received appropriate resources to provide standardized training to Supervisory Deputy Returning Officers and Deputy Returning Officers. As in past elections, Poll Clerks were briefed on their responsibilities by the Deputy Returning Officers and followed the directions provided in the updated “Guide for Polling Place Officials”.

Mapping Resources…. The maps reviewed by Returning Officers in July 2000 were used in advertisements and posted at the polling places. Maps had been updated with new civic address data, where available, to ensure currency and accuracy.

In accordance with legislation, maps of each electoral division were advertised in newspapers of general circulation on two occasions during the election period. The first advertisement appeared in the week of February 19, and included Election Proclamations, Returning Officers’ office hours and contact information, qualifications for Special Ballot voters, and information regarding the availability of level access in the Returning Officers’ offices and advance polling places.

The second advertisement appeared in the week of March 5, and included information on regular, advance and Special Ballot polls, along with the polling place maps.

Both advertisements appeared as inserts in the Edmonton and Calgary daily newspapers. They included information for electoral divisions that shared a boundary with the cities, along with the electoral divisions within the two cities. As an added service, the second insert was hand-delivered to all residences of non-subscribers in Edmonton and Calgary to best disseminate information to all electors. Additional banner advertisements were published throughout the election period to encourage electors to obtain necessary polling day information from the Voter Information Centre. The advertisements appeared in five daily newspapers outside the Edmonton/Calgary area, in one hundred twenty-nine weekly newspapers, and in fourteen ethnic newspapers.

Elector Information…. Electors received information throughout the election period from a number of sources. Information was compiled and made available on a timely basis, given that all activities in the electoral cycle must follow the issuance of the Writs of Election. Returning Officers secured office space as soon as the Writs were issued, and contact information for them was available two days later.

Polling places were selected after the issuance of the Writs and were available to callers within the first week of the election period. Candidates’ nominations closed at 2:00 p.m. on the fourteenth day following the issuance of the Writs, and a complete listing of candidates was available on the website two hours later.

Elections Alberta’s website provided answers to commonly asked questions regarding eligibility criteria and availability of voter assistance. It included statistical information from previous events, an election calendar highlighting the key dates in the election period, contact information for Returning Officers across the province, and a listing of candidates for each electoral division. The website was accessed frequently and will be expanded to provide additional information during the next electoral event. Many electors used the email address provided to communicate their questions and suggestions to Elections Alberta. Returning Officers’ offices were open six days of the week, Monday through Saturday, and offered extended hours on key dates.

The Voter Information Centre handled over twenty-four thousand calls throughout the election period, including four thousand on Polling Day. Operators were available weekdays from 8:15 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., and Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Operators answered general inquiries and directed electors to their polling places.

Election Calendar…. The election calendar posted on the website highlighted the following key dates.

Date Activity
Monday, February 12, 2001 Issuance of the Writs of Election to Returning Officers in the eighty-three electoral divisions
Saturday, February 17 First day for electors to be added to the Lists of Electors in the Returning Officers’ offices (start of Revisions Period)
Monday, February 26 at 2:00 PM Last opportunity for Candidates to file Nomination Papers in the Returning Officers’ offices
Saturday, March 3 at 4:00 PM Last opportunity for electors to be added to the Lists of Electors in the Returning Officers’ offices (end of Revisions Period)
Thursday, March 8 First day to vote in the Advance Polls (9:00 AM to 8:00 PM)
Friday, March 9 Second day to vote in the Advance Polls (9:00 AM to 8:00 PM)
Saturday, March 10 Third day to vote in the Advance Polls (9:00 AM to 8:00 PM)
Monday, March 12 Polling Day (9:00 AM to 8:00 PM)

Legislative and Procedural Changes…. A legislative change passed in May 2000 directed that all registered political parties were entitled to receive an updated List of Electors in the fourth and fifth year following the preceding Provincial General Election. Lists of Electors were made available to all registered political parties, upon request, in November 2000, the fourth year following the 1997 Provincial General Election. Because no changes were made to the Lists of Electors prior to the March 2001 Provincial General Election, no additional Lists were provided to political parties for campaign use.

The Alberta Register of Electors System (AROES), used to manage Register data, provided computerized assistance to Returning Officers in the management of the election. Returning Officers assigned all polling subdivisions to polling places, which allowed all users of the system to access polling place information for the entire province. This innovation enabled electors to determine their polling place by calling any one of the eighty-three Returning Officers’ offices, instead of having to first identify the Returning Officer responsible for their electoral division. AROES also facilitated the preparation of prescribed forms and staffing reports.

Cell phone usage in polling places was prohibited to avoid unnecessary distraction. During the previous election, cell phones became quite intrusive in busy polling places, to the point that it was sometimes difficult for election officials to communicate effectively with electors. The blanket prohibition ensured that all election officials and scrutineers were governed by the same rules.

An important legislative change occurred in regard to the issuance of Special Ballots. These ballots are issued to electors who are unable to vote at the advance polls, or on Polling Day, due to:

  • physical incapacity,
  • absence from the electoral division,
  • being an eligible prison inmate,
  • being an election official, candidate, official agent or scrutineer whose official duties require their attendance at a polling place other than their own,
  • being resident in a remote area, or
  • other circumstances prescribed by the Chief Electoral Officer.

Previously, electors who wished to request a Special Ballot had to be on the List of Electors. Further to a legislative change enacted in 1998, electors could be added to the List of Electors following the submission of a properly completed Special Ballot application. They were also given the opportunity to add their names to the Register of Electors, to ensure their names would appear on subsequent Lists of Electors extracted from the Register.

For the first time, inmates serving terms of ten days or less, and those who were incarcerated for non-payment of fines, were eligible to vote. Inmates were required to vote in the electoral division in which they were ordinarily resident, as is the case with all electors. Eligible inmates were provided with Special Ballots upon request.

The Special Ballot system was also used to provide a secure voting environment to electors who felt that their safety would be compromised by the inclusion of their name on a List of Electors or their attendance at a polling place. These electors were assigned a number by the Chief Electoral Officer, which appeared in the Poll Book and on the List of Electors in lieu of their name.

Following the election, candidates and official agents were authorized by legislation to request photocopies of the Poll Books completed on the Polling Day. The photocopies are made available on a cost-recovery basis, on request.

Nominated Candidates…. Nomination day was Monday, February 26. That was the last day on which prospective candidates were able to file nomination papers with the Returning Officer in the electoral division in which they wished to contest the election.

By 2:00 p.m., when nominations closed, 318 candidates had filed nomination papers. The distribution of candidates by political party affiliation follows:

Alberta First Party 16
Alberta Greens 10
Alberta Liberal Party 83
Alberta New Democratic Party 83
Alberta Social Credit Party 12
Communist Party-Alberta 2
Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta 83
Independent 29

The complete list of nominated candidates was posted to the Elections Alberta website two hours after the close of nominations across the province.

No candidate withdrew following the close of nominations and no candidate was elected by acclamation.

Special Ballot Polls…. By legislation, a Special Ballot poll was established in each of the eighty-three electoral divisions. The poll is established to facilitate voting for electors who are not able to vote at the advance poll, or on Polling Day. It is often used by electors who are travelling, working, or studying away from their own electoral division for extended periods. Availability of the Special Ballot was advertised in newspapers and on the website.

It is often viewed as a mail-in ballot, but ballots may also be completed in the Returning Officer’s office or hand-delivered by an individual at the elector’s request. While every effort is made to facilitate the provision of Special Ballots to electors, it is a legislative requirement that an elector must request his or her own Special Ballot: it cannot be requested on his or her behalf. This is to ensure that the Special Ballot is issued to, and completed by, the appropriate elector.

The Special Ballot uses a series of envelopes to protect the confidentiality of the ballot, and contains an elector’s declaration identifying the reason for use, along with an undertaking confirming that the elector has not yet voted and will not vote a second time.

Returning Officers sent Special Ballots throughout the province and even out of the country. Electors were able to request a Special Ballot at the beginning of the election period, and were able to vote for the candidate or political party of their choice. This helped to ensure that electors had adequate time to complete and return the Special Ballot by the close of polls on Polling Day.

In the same way that each elector must vote within their own electoral division, each elector was required to request a Special Ballot from the Returning Officer in his or her own electoral division, and to return it to the office from which it was issued.

A total of 11,100 Special Ballots were received by the close of polls on Polling Day.

Advance Polls…. By legislation, advance polls were established in at least one, and not more than four, locations in each electoral division on the Thursday, Friday and Saturday prior to Polling Day. Advance polls were open from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. on March 8th, 9th, and 10th. All advance polls offered level access.

These polls were established to accommodate electors who were unable to vote on Polling Day due to:

  • physical incapacity,
  • absence, or
  • being an election official, candidate, official agent or scrutineer whose official duties preclude their attendance at the polling place established for their own polling subdivision.

A total of 45,796 ballots were cast at 161 advance polls.

Mobile Polls…. By legislation, mobile polls were established on Polling Day in seniors’ lodges, seniors’ residences, and treatment centres with ten or more residents or inpatients, where consultation with facility staff deemed the service to be appropriate.

Mobile polls accommodated electors in these facilities during hours deemed appropriate by facility staff, and were conducted in a fixed location, or by going bed-to-bed, or using both methods.

All electors identified by the facility staff as being well enough to vote are eligible to vote in the electoral division in which the facility is located. In accordance with legislation, facility staff sometimes restricted participation to the deputy returning officer, poll clerk, interpreter, and facility representative, if appropriate for the well-being of the residents or inpatients.

A total of 16,713 ballots were cast at 175 mobile polls.

Polling Day…. By legislation, polls were open from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. on Monday, March 12, 2001. There were 5,157 polling stations established across the province, each staffed by a Deputy Returning Officer and Poll Clerk. Supervisory Deputy Returning Officers were hired in polling places with multiple polling stations to assist in directing electors to the correct polling station.

Poll workers were responsible for taking the vote, swearing-in electors whose names did not appear on the Lists of Electors, recording necessary changes to the Lists of Electors, conducting the unofficial count and returning all polling day material to the Returning Officers in a secure manner.

Poll workers were also responsible for answering electors’ inquiries and for working with the scrutineers appointed by candidates to observe Polling Day proceedings. Both poll workers and scrutineers are to be commended for their cooperative efforts in ensuring fairness and transparency in the process.

The role of poll workers has been expanded to include the collection of information that will be used in updating the Register of Electors. Polling Day is an excellent opportunity to collect new and updated information from electors for use in refreshing the Register and subsequent Lists of Electors.

At the close of polls, poll workers conducted the unofficial count and telephoned results to the Returning Officers. All results were communicated in a timely manner and were made available in Returning Officers’ offices.

Additions to the Lists of Electors…. A total of 113,550 electors were added to the Lists of Electors during the Revisions Period and on Polling Day. This figure represents electors who were not included during the Confirmation Process, and those who moved or attained the age, residency, or citizenship eligibility criteria following the Confirmation Process.

On average, twenty-two electors were sworn in at each regular polling station. Areas of high mobility, or significant recent growth, experienced the highest number of additions.

The Register of Electors contained 1,648,473 names in 1996, following the November 1996 Provincial General Enumeration. The number of names increased to 1,761,970 after the March 1997 Provincial General Election, which included names added during the Revisions Period and on Polling Day.

At the end of the August/September 2000 Confirmation Process, the names of 1,809,171 electors appeared in the Register of Electors. The names of those electors appeared on the Lists of Electors that were distributed to registered political parties in November 2000. The breakdown by electoral division is shown on Table 1.

The number of names increased following the March 2001 Provincial General Election to 1,922,721, which represents the number of names on the Lists of Electors at the close of polls on Polling Day.

At May 2001, the number of names had been reduced to 1,902,906 after electors’ names were removed from old addresses, and after deletions were made at electors’ requests following out-of-province moves. This reduction is also partially attributable to the number of electors who withheld consent for participation in the Register of Electors.

In order to receive a ballot, an elector’s name must appear on the List of Electors. It is not mandatory, however, to participate in the Register of Electors. Electors were encouraged to participate to increase the accuracy of future Lists and to reduce the number of electors having to swear-in to vote at the next electoral event. Still, some electors prefer not to have their names included in the Register on an ongoing basis. This is one of the reasons that a certain number of Polling Day swear-ins must be anticipated at all electoral events.

Accuracy of the Lists of Electors…. Accurate, current Lists of Electors are essential both for campaigning and effective Polling Day administration. The Lists of Electors distributed to registered political parties in November 2000, and subsequently used at the polls, were compared to the post-election Lists produced in May 2001 to gauge accuracy.

It is recognized that an indeterminate number of eligible electors actively choose not to participate in the electoral process, so it is acknowledged that the List of Electors does not contain every eligible elector. At the same time, a benchmark must be established to gauge accuracy. For that reason, the assumption is made that the post-election Lists of Electors are one-hundred percent accurate, since they include all electors who had provided information during the Confirmation Process, the Revisions Period, or on Polling Day.

Table 1 illustrates the accuracy of the November 2000 Lists of Electors in comparison to the post-election Lists. Overall, the Lists were found to be 95.1% accurate. Only 4.9% of electors that appeared on the May 2001 Lists of Electors were added during the Revisions Period and on Polling Day.

Official Results…. The Official Results were announced by each of the eighty-three Returning Officers on Thursday, March 22. No judicial recount or appeal, pursuant to Section 142 of the Election Act, was applied for in any electoral division. No controverted election petition was filed for the election.

Publication…. Names of the eighty-three newly elected Members of the Legislative Assembly were published in the Alberta Gazette on April 14, 2001 in accordance with Section 147 of the Election Act.

Custody and Inspection of Election Documents…. All Polling Day documentation was returned to Elections Alberta following the announcement of the Official Results, in accordance with Section 140 of the Election Act.

Section 149 authorizes candidates and their official agents to review all Polling Day documentation for their electoral division, with the exception of ballots, in the thirty-day period following the publication of the names of Members of the Legislative Assembly in the Alberta Gazette.

Continuous Register of Electors Management…. Elector information collected throughout the election period and on Polling Day was incorporated into the Register of Electors, where permission was granted by the elector, for preparation of future Lists of Electors.

Lists were updated following the election and distributed to registered political parties and Members of the Legislative Assembly for their use under Section 16(1) of the Election Act. Restrictions for use are contained at Section 17, to ensure elector information is used appropriately. Penalties for misuse include fines up to $100,000, or terms of imprisonment up to one year, or both.

Section 17 now directs that both registered political parties and Members of the Legislative Assembly receive updated Lists on a regular basis. Updated Lists must be provided immediately after the election, two years after the election, during the fourth and fifth years following the election, and following any updates made to the Register subsequent to revisions to electoral division boundaries.

With any large database, it is a major challenge to compare and correct entries against another data set. It is particularly challenging when some entries cannot be matched conclusively because of incomplete information. This is particularly difficult in the case of common names where birth date and previous address information is unavailable.

Maintaining the accuracy and currency of these Lists of Electors will be a significant challenge and a focal point of activities at Elections Alberta. Possible data sources are being reviewed for use in updating Register information on an ongoing basis. These activities must reconcile the need for updated information with the electors’ rights to privacy.

Candidates’ Deposits…. A total of 204 candidates’ deposits of $200 were forfeited. Forfeiture occurred when unsuccessful candidates received less than fifty percent of the votes received by the winning candidate. A breakdown follows:

Number
Nominated
Number
Forfeited
Alberta First Party 16 16
Alberta Greens 10 10
Alberta Liberal Party 83 55
Alberta New Democratic Party 83 80
Alberta Social Credit Party 12 12
Communist Party-Alberta 2 2
Progressive Conservative Association of Alberta 83 0
Independent 29 29
Total 318 204

The forfeited amount of $40,800 was paid through Elections Alberta to the Provincial Treasurer for deposit to the General Revenue Fund.

Campaign Period Financial Statements…. Candidates’ campaign period financial statements must be filed with Elections Alberta by July 12, 2001, four months after Polling Day. Details of expenses incurred by each candidate will be published in a newspaper circulated in the electoral division of that candidate.

Political parties’ campaign period financial statements must be filed with Elections Alberta by September 12, 2001, six months after Polling Day.

Copies of all financial statements are placed on the Public Files maintained by Elections Alberta and are available for examination during normal office hours. The Twenty-fourth Annual Report of the Chief Electoral Officer will provide details on all campaign period financial statements.

Remarks of the Chief Electoral Officer…. The electoral activities conducted over the past year are perfect examples of successful teamwork. An enormous group of electors contributed in various ways to the successful conduct of the Confirmation Process and Provincial General Election. We owe a vote of thanks to everyone: to the Confirmation Officials who collected information door-to-door; to the election officials who worked at least a twelve-hour day on Polling Day to provide direct voter assistance; to the political parties and candidates who offered their time and talents to provide the electorate with choices; and to their scrutineers who were the eyes and ears of the candidates on Polling Day.

Special thanks go out to the Returning Officers who hired and managed staff complements that were sometimes in the hundreds. Their tireless efforts helped to ensure that the enormity of administrative detail behind the Polling Day machine was virtually invisible, so the focus could appropriately be directed towards the candidates and their campaigns. Each staff member at Elections Alberta is also to be commended for their commitment and support of all clients throughout the election period.

Many people actively participate because of the value they see in this task. Confirmation and election officials are paid for their work, but will never get rich from the remuneration. Many people regularly work the elections at the provincial, municipal and federal levels; and many have done so over the years because they recognize the importance of this role and enjoy the Polling Day excitement.

Our task is to prepare a professional, capable work force of about seventeen thousand through standardized training and detailed instruction. Our task is also to provide effective resources to both our workers and our clients: the registered political parties, candidates and, ultimately, the electors.

Public notification of these events continues to be a challenge for us. It is not easy to get timely, accurate information into the hands of almost two million electors. This challenge is compounded by the compressed timelines of electoral events. Deadlines approach quickly and electors must be aware of these activities early on so they are able to participate.

Over the past years, we have increased our advertising, our Internet presence, and our availability by telephone through the Voter Information Centre. These initiatives would not have been possible without the approval and support of the Standing Committee on Legislative Offices. I look forward to working with the Committee, and with all clients, to provide continuous improvements in service delivery to the electors of the Province.

Table 1: Number of Names on Lists of Electors Following the Confirmation Process
Accuracy of the Lists of Electors

No. Electoral Division Number of Names on
November 2000 List1
Number of Names on
May 2001 List2
Accuracy of
November 2000 List3

1

Athabasca-Wabasca

11,906

12,598

94.5%

2

Lesser Slave Lake

13,316

14,200

93.8%

3

Calgary-Bow

21,521

23,045

93.4%

4

Calgary-Buffalo

21,601

24,500

88.2%

5

Calgary-Cross

20,713

21,708

95.4%

6

Calgary-Currie

21,127

22,809

92.6%

7

Calgary-East

19,497

20,476

95.2%

8

Calgary-Egmont

25,820

26,419

97.7%

9

Calgary-Elbow

23,024

24,693

93.2%

10

Calgary-Fish Creek

21,886

22,201

98.6%

11

Calgary-Foothills

32,414

33,736

96.1%

12

Calgary-Fort

21,387

22,813

93.7%

13

Calgary-Glenmore

22,280

22,934

97.1%

14

Calgary-Lougheed

21,316

22,018

96.8%

15

Calgary-McCall

22,586

23,918

94.4%

16

Calgary-Montrose

20,470

21,255

96.3%

17

Calgary-Mountain View

21,370

22,950

93.1%

18

Calgary-North Hill

21,227

22,359

94.9%

19

Calgary-North West

36,346

38,382

94.7%

20

Calgary-Nose Creek

31,440

33,526

93.8%

21

Calgary-Shaw

47,697

49,380

96.6%

22

Calgary-Varsity

21,836

23,190

94.2%

23

Calgary-West

30,259

31,935

94.8%

24

Edmonton-Beverly-Clareview

20,261

21,291

95.2%

25

Edmonton-Calder

22,473

23,476

95.7%

26

Edmonton-Castle Downs

24,074

24,526

98.2%

27

Edmonton-Centre

19,485

22,055

88.3%

28

Edmonton-Ellerslie

18,345

19,173

95.7%

29

Edmonton-Glengarry

20,764

21,637

96.0%

30

Edmonton-Glenora

19,968

21,026

95.0%

31

Edmonton-Gold Bar

21,867

23,266

94.0%

32

Edmonton-Highlands

19,611

21,111

92.9%

33

Edmonton-Manning

24,688

25,921

95.2%

34

Edmonton-McClung

22,961

24,284

94.6%

35

Edmonton-Meadowlark

21,088

22,404

94.1%

36

Edmonton-Mill Creek

24,423

26,097

93.6%

37

Edmonton-Mill Woods

17,407

18,506

94.1%

38

Edmonton-Norwood

18,168

19,287

94.2%

39

Edmonton-Riverview

21,740

23,069

94.2%

40

Edmonton-Rutherford

21,539

22,534

95.6%

41

Edmonton-Strathcona

21,653

24,037

90.1%

42

Edmonton-Whitemud

28,551

30,270

94.3%

43

Airdrie-Rocky View

28,339

29,734

95.3%

44

Banff-Cochrane

24,649

26,654

92.5%

45

Barrhead-Westlock

16,052

16,613

96.6%

46

Bonnyville-Cold Lake

15,700

16,621

94.5%

47

Cardston-Taber-Warner

17,702

18,371

96.4%

48

Clover Bar-Fort Saskatchewan

24,533

25,389

96.6%

49

Cypress-Medicine Hat

19,022

19,688

96.6%

50

Drayton Valley-Calmar

17,348

18,346

94.6%

51

Drumheller-Chinook

15,312

15,877

96.4%

52

Dunvegan

15,482

15,832

97.8%

53

Fort McMurray

22,961

23,612

97.2%

54

Grande Prairie-Smoky

19,655

20,948

93.8%

55

Grande Prairie-Wapiti

18,540

19,489

95.1%

56

Highwood

27,866

29,372

94.9%

57

Innisfail-Sylvan Lake

22,606

23,799

95.0%

58

Lac La Biche-St. Paul

14,805

15,508

95.5%

59

Lacombe-Stettler

19,187

20,816

92.2%

60

Leduc

23,126

24,194

95.6%

61

Lethbridge-East

23,229

23,683

98.1%

62

Lethbridge-West

22,543

24,505

92.0%

63

Little Bow

18,174

18,573

97.9%

64

Livingstone-Macleod

23,083

24,240

95.2%

65

Medicine Hat

23,904

25,043

95.5%

66

Olds-Didsbury-Three Hills

20,211

21,231

95.2%

67

Peace River

15,604

16,036

97.3%

68

Ponoka-Rimbey

15,434

16,050

96.2%

69

Red Deer-North

20,244

20,763

97.5%

70

Red Deer-South

23,293

24,739

94.2%

71

Redwater

20,631

21,438

96.2%

72

Rocky Mountain House

19,008

19,962

95.2%

73

St. Albert

26,956

28,394

94.9%

74

Sherwood Park

30,396

31,532

96.4%

75

Spruce Grove-Sturgeon-St. Albert

22,616

23,631

95.7%

76

Stony Plain

21,946

23,482

93.5%

77

Strathmore-Brooks

23,313

24,110

96.7%

78

Vegreville-Viking

18,578

19,102

97.3%

79

Vermilion-Lloydminster

19,134

19,669

97.3%

80

Wainwright

18,823

19,178

98.1%

81

West Yellowhead

17,894

18,832

95.0%

82

Wetaskiwin-Camrose

21,747

22,550

96.4%

83

Whitecourt-Ste. Anne

19,420

20,285

95.7%

Totals

1,809,171

1,902,906

95.1%

1This represents the number of names on the Lists of Electors after elector information was confirmed, revised, added and deleted during the August 26 – September 11 door-to-door Confirmation Process.

2This includes the number of names on the Lists of Electors from the Confirmation Process, with the addition of elector information collected throughout the Revisions Period and on Polling Day and following the deletion of duplicated, relocated and deceased electors.

3The percentage of names of electors on the May 2001 Lists of Electors that were included on the November 2000 Lists.

Members Elected to the Twenty-fifth Legislative Assembly Province of Alberta

Electoral Division

Name

Political Affiliation

01 Athabasca-Wabasca Mike Cardinal Progressive Conservative
02 Lesser Slave Lake Pearl Calahasen Progressive Conservative
03 Calgary-Bow Alana DeLong Progressive Conservative
04 Calgary-Buffalo Harvey Cenaiko Progressive Conservative
05 Calgary-Cross Yvonne Fritz Progressive Conservative
06 Calgary-Currie Jon Lord Progressive Conservative
07 Calgary-East Moe Amery Progressive Conservative
08 Calgary-Egmont Denis Herard Progressive Conservative
09 Calgary-Elbow Ralph Klein Progressive Conservative
10 Calgary-Fish Creek Heather Forsyth Progressive Conservative
11 Calgary-Foothills Pat Nelson Progressive Conservative
12 Calgary-Fort Wayne Cao Progressive Conservative
13 Calgary-Glenmore Ron Stevens Progressive Conservative
14 Calgary-Lougheed Marlene Graham Progressive Conservative
15 Calgary-McCall Shiraz Shariff Progressive Conservative
16 Calgary-Montrose Hung Pham Progressive Conservative
17 Calgary-Mountain View Mark Hlady Progressive Conservative
18 Calgary-North Hill Richard Magnus Progressive Conservative
19 Calgary-North West Greg Melchin Progressive Conservative
20 Calgary-Nose Creek Gary Mar Progressive Conservative
21 Calgary-Shaw Cindy Ady Progressive Conservative
22 Calgary-Varsity Murray Smith Progressive Conservative
23 Calgary-West Karen Kryczka Progressive Conservative
24 Edmonton-Beverly-Clareview Julius Yankowsky Progressive Conservative
25 Edmonton-Calder Brent Rathgeber Progressive Conservative
26 Edmonton-Castle Downs Thomas Lukaszuk Progressive Conservative
27 Edmonton-Centre Laurie Blakeman Alberta Liberal
28 Edmonton-Ellerslie Debby Carlson Alberta Liberal
29 Edmonton-Glengarry Bill Bonner Alberta Liberal
30 Edmonton-Glenora Drew Hutton Progressive Conservative
31 Edmonton-Gold Bar Hugh MacDonald Alberta Liberal
32 Edmonton-Highlands Brian Mason Alberta New Democrats
33 Edmonton-Manning Tony Vandermeer Progressive Conservative
34 Edmonton-McClung Mark Norris Progressive Conservative
35 Edmonton-Meadowlark Bob Maskell Progressive Conservative
36 Edmonton-Mill Creek Gene Zwozdesky Progressive Conservative
37 Edmonton-Mill Woods Don Massey Alberta Liberal
38 Edmonton-Norwood Gary Masyk Progressive Conservative
39 Edmonton-Riverview Kevin Taft Alberta Liberal
40 Edmonton-Rutherford Ian McClelland Progressive Conservative
41 Edmonton-Strathcona Raj Pannu Alberta New Democrats
42 Edmonton-Whitemud David Hancock Progressive Conservative
43 Airdrie-Rocky View Carol Haley Progressive Conservative
44 Banff-Cochrane Janis Tarchuk Progressive Conservative
45 Barrhead-Westlock Ken Kowalski Progressive Conservative
46 Bonnyville-Cold Lake Denis Ducharme Progressive Conservative
47 Cardston-Taber-Warner Broyce Jacobs Progressive Conservative
48 Clover Bar-Fort Saskatchewan Rob Lougheed Progressive Conservative
49 Cypress-Medicine Hat Lorne Taylor Progressive Conservative
50 Drayton Valley-Calmar Tony Abbott Progressive Conservative
51 Drumheller-Chinook Shirley McClellan Progressive Conservative
52 Dunvegan Hector Goudreau Progressive Conservative
53 Fort McMurray Guy Boutilier Progressive Conservative
54 Grande Prairie-Smoky Mel Knight Progressive Conservative
55 Grande Prairie-Wapiti Gordon Graydon Progressive Conservative
56 Highwood Don Tannas Progressive Conservative
57 Innisfail-Sylvan Lake Luke Ouellette Progressive Conservative
58 Lac La Biche-St. Paul Ray Danyluk Progressive Conservative
59 Lacombe-Stettler Judy Gordon Progressive Conservative
60 Leduc Albert Klapstein Progressive Conservative
61 Lethbridge-East Ken Nicol Alberta Liberal
62 Lethbridge-West Clint Dunford Progressive Conservative
63 Little Bow Barry McFarland Progressive Conservative
64 Livingstone-Macleod David Coutts Progressive Conservative
65 Medicine Hat Rob Renner Progressive Conservative
66 Olds-Didsbury-Three Hills Richard Marz Progressive Conservative
67 Peace River Gary Friedel Progressive Conservative
68 Ponoka-Rimbey Halvar Jonson Progressive Conservative
69 Red Deer-North Mary Anne Jablonski Progressive Conservative
70 Red Deer-South Victor Doerksen Progressive Conservative
71 Redwater Dave Broda Progressive Conservative
72 Rocky Mountain House Ty Lund Progressive Conservative
73 St. Albert Mary O’Neill Progressive Conservative
74 Sherwood Park Iris Evans Progressive Conservative
75 Spruce Grove-Sturgeon-St. Albert Doug Horner Progressive Conservative
76 Stony Plain Stan Woloshyn Progressive Conservative
77 Strathmore-Brooks Lyle Oberg Progressive Conservative
78 Vegreville-Viking Ed Stelmach Progressive Conservative
79 Vermilion-Lloydminster Lloyd Snelgrove Progressive Conservative
80 Wainwright Robert (Butch) Fischer Progressive Conservative
81 West Yellowhead Ivan Strang Progressive Conservative
82 Wetaskiwin-Camrose LeRoy Johnson Progressive Conservative
83 Whitecourt-Ste. Anne George Vanderburg Progressive Conservative

List of Returning Officers
(Confirmation and General Election)

Electoral Division

Name

Residence

01 Athabasca-Wabasca Claudette Sheremata Athabasca
02 Lesser Slave Lake June Roe Kinuso
03 Calgary-Bow Brenda Sanden Calgary
04 Calgary-Buffalo Ann Snow Calgary
05 Calgary-Cross Wally Clarke Calgary
06 Calgary-Currie Lorraine Bereta Calgary
07 Calgary-East Le-Ann Lundgren Calgary
08 Calgary-Egmont Doreen Green Calgary
09 Calgary-Elbow Gina Hull Calgary
10 Calgary-Fish Creek Wendy Watson Calgary
11 Calgary-Foothills Sharon Ferris Calgary
12 Calgary-Fort Sheila Cooper Calgary
13 Calgary-Glenmore Carol Kiernan Calgary
14 Calgary-Lougheed Margaret Tatham Calgary
15 Calgary-McCall Judy Newman Calgary
16 Calgary-Montrose Lynn Warkentin Calgary
17 Calgary-Mountain View Margo Aftergood Calgary
18 Calgary-North Hill E. Nels Crowther Calgary
19 Calgary-North West Bunny Rossiter Calgary
20 Calgary-Nose Creek Jeanette Bergeson Calgary
21 Calgary-Shaw Sheila Hardman Calgary
22 Calgary-Varsity Mary Lou Robertson Calgary
23 Calgary-West George Hopkins Calgary
24 Edmonton-Beverly-Clareview Roger Poloway Edmonton
25 Edmonton-Calder Verna Acton Edmonton
26 Edmonton-Castle Downs Elizabeth Burk Edmonton
27 Edmonton-Centre Maureen Tetzlaff Edmonton
28 Edmonton-Ellerslie Dennis Seelochan Edmonton
29 Edmonton-Glengarry Willis Romanko Edmonton
30 Edmonton-Glenora Kathryn Strawson Edmonton
31 Edmonton-Gold Bar Henry Harder Edmonton
32 Edmonton-Highlands Nancy Barr Edmonton
33 Edmonton-Manning Walter Ewoniak Edmonton
34 Edmonton-McClung Don Clarke Edmonton
35 Edmonton-Meadowlark Donald McCallum Edmonton
36 Edmonton-Mill Creek William Fleming Edmonton
37 Edmonton-Mill Woods Jacqueline Elton Edmonton
38 Edmonton-Norwood Dan Papirnik Edmonton
39 Edmonton-Riverview Teresa Griffiths Edmonton
40 Edmonton-Rutherford Ried Zittlau Edmonton
41 Edmonton-Strathcona Hartmut Schafer Edmonton
42 Edmonton-Whitemud Bernard Zolner Edmonton
43 Airdrie-Rocky View Herbert Buchanan Airdrie
44 Banff-Cochrane Susann Britton Canmore
45 Barrhead-Westlock Clement Fagnan Westlock
46 Bonnyville-Cold Lake Roy McDonald Ardmore
47 Cardston-Taber-Warner Thomas Addy Taber
48 Clover Bar-Fort Saskatchewan Margaret Wade Fort Saskatchewan
49 Cypress-Medicine Hat Lyn Dillenbeck Foremost
50 Drayton Valley-Calmar Donna Palmer Drayton Valley
51 Drumheller-Chinook *Lorna Sullivan
**Lee Ann Kuhn
Hanna
Hanna
52 Dunvegan Larry Chorney Fairview
53 Fort McMurray Pauline Gauthier Fort McMurray
54 Grande Prairie-Smoky Lana Fjellner Valleyview
55 Grande Prairie-Wapiti Diane Bootle Grande Prairie
56 Highwood Laureen Maynard High River
57 Innisfail-Sylvan Lake Kenneth Fulton Innisfail
58 Lac La Biche-St. Paul Linda Ference St. Paul
59 Lacombe-Stettler Elsie Brewin Blackfalds
60 Leduc Maurice Fitzpatrick Leduc
61 Lethbridge-East Jan Okamura Lethbridge
62 Lethbridge-West Robert Hubber Lethbridge
63 Little Bow Eugene Waskiewich Vulcan
64 Livingstone-Macleod Evan Strachan Fort Macleod
65 Medicine Hat David Oliphant Medicine Hat
66 Olds-Didsbury-Three Hills Jim Allison Didsbury
67 Peace River Cheryl Anderson Peace River
68 Ponoka-Rimbey Margaret MacKay Ponoka
69 Red Deer-North Mary Lawrence Red Deer
70 Red Deer-South Jan Miller Red Deer
71 Redwater Joanne Hrycun Gibbons
72 Rocky Mountain House Jean Graham Rocky Mountain House
73 St. Albert Donna Parchewsky St. Albert
74 Sherwood Park Marlene Martin Sherwood Park
75 Spruce Grove-Sturgeon-St. Albert Louise Kluthe Morinville
76 Stony Plain Sylvia Wood Spruce Grove
77 Strathmore-Brooks Delia Johnson Brooks
78 Vegreville-Viking William Nawrot Vegreville
79 Vermilion-Lloydminster Borden Kaminsky Innisfree
80 Wainwright Vonda Peterson Wainwright
81 West Yellowhead Norma Fahl Hinton
82 Wetaskiwin-Camrose Gordon Andres Wetaskiwin
83 Whitecourt-Ste. Anne Judy Patterson Mayerthorpe

*Appointed for August/September 2000 Confirmation Process
**Appointed for March 12, 2001 Provincial General Election

Voter Turnout Summary

ED No

Electoral Division

Names on List
Pre-Election

Number of
Swear-Ins

Names on List
Post-Election

Valid/Declined/
Rejected Ballots

Voter Turnout(%)

1

Athabasca-Wabasca

11,906

716

12,622

6,361

50.4%

2

Lesser Slave Lake

13,316

869

14,185

6,458

45.5%

3

Calgary-Bow

21,521

1,989

23,510

12,965

55.1%

4

Calgary-Buffalo

21,601

3,243

24,844

10,352

41.7%

5

Calgary-Cross

20,713

1,207

21,920

9,128

41.6%

6

Calgary-Currie

21,127

2,093

23,220

11,209

48.3%

7

Calgary-East

19,497

1,012

20,509

8,586

41.9%

8

Calgary-Egmont

25,820

929

26,749

13,956

52.2%

9

Calgary-Elbow

23,024

1,762

24,786

15,317

61.8%

10

Calgary-Fish Creek

21,886

668

22,554

13,061

57.9%

11

Calgary-Foothills

32,414

1,794

34,208

17,959

52.5%

12

Calgary-Fort

21,387

1,495

22,882

9,870

43.1%

13

Calgary-Glenmore

22,280

1,364

23,644

14,336

60.6%

14

Calgary-Lougheed

21,316

783

22,099

12,105

54.8%

15

Calgary-McCall

22,586

1,484

24,070

9,377

39.0%

16

Calgary-Montrose

20,470

1,163

21,633

8,996

41.6%

17

Calgary-Mountain View

21,370

1,843

23,213

10,728

46.2%

18

Calgary-North Hill

21,227

1,403

22,630

11,060

48.9%

19

Calgary-North West

36,346

2,396

38,742

21,422

55.3%

20

Calgary-Nose Creek

31,440

2,338

33,778

16,087

47.6%

21

Calgary-Shaw

47,697

1,669

49,366

25,192

51.0%

22

Calgary-Varsity

21,836

1,424

23,260

13,820

59.4%

23

Calgary-West

30,259

2,043

32,302

17,645

54.6%

24

Edmonton-Beverly-Clareview

20,261

1,029

21,290

10,374

48.7%

25

Edmonton-Calder

22,473

1,198

23,671

12,238

51.7%

26

Edmonton-Castle Downs

24,074

847

24,921

11,700

46.9%

27

Edmonton-Centre

19,485

3,163

22,648

11,650

51.4%

28

Edmonton-Ellerslie

18,345

865

19,210

10,033

52.2%

29

Edmonton-Glengarry

20,764

999

21,763

10,512

48.3%

30

Edmonton-Glenora

19,968

1,375

21,343

12,102

56.7%

31

Edmonton-Gold Bar

21,867

1,470

23,337

15,008

64.3%

32

Edmonton-Highlands

19,611

1,928

21,539

10,074

46.8%

33

Edmonton-Manning

24,688

1,333

26,021

12,991

49.9%

34

Edmonton-McClung

22,961

1,762

24,723

13,839

56.0%

35

Edmonton-Meadowlark

21,088

1,403

22,491

12,593

56.0%

36

Edmonton-Mill Creek

24,423

1,884

26,307

14,565

55.4%

37

Edmonton-Mill Woods

17,407

1,139

18,546

10,075

54.3%

38

Edmonton-Norwood

18,168

1,175

19,343

8,680

44.9%

39

Edmonton-Riverview

21,740

1,468

23,208

14,975

64.5%

40

Edmonton-Rutherford

21,539

1,223

22,762

12,838

56.4%

41

Edmonton-Strathcona

21,653

2,728

24,381

13,857

56.8%

42

Edmonton-Whitemud

28,551

2,302

30,853

18,621

60.4%

43

Airdrie-Rocky View

28,339

2,207

30,546

16,538

54.1%

44

Banff-Cochrane

24,649

2,579

27,228

13,465

49.5%

45

Barrhead-Westlock

16,052

742

16,794

10,401

61.9%

46

Bonnyville-Cold Lake

15,700

988

16,688

8,016

48.0%

47

Cardston-Taber-Warner

17,702

768

18,470

9,809

53.1%

48

Clover Bar-Fort Saskatchewan

24,533

1,087

25,620

15,455

60.3%

49

Cypress-Medicine Hat

19,022

856

19,878

9,932

50.0%

50

Drayton Valley-Calmar

17,348

1,068

18,416

11,236

61.0%

51

Drumheller-Chinook

15,312

754

16,066

9,185

57.2%

52

Dunvegan

15,482

425

15,907

8,739

54.9%

53

Fort McMurray

22,961

1,209

24,170

9,189

38.0%

54

Grande Prairie-Smoky

19,655

1,413

21,068

9,245

43.9%

55

Grande Prairie-Wapiti

18,540

1,190

19,730

8,676

44.0%

56

Highwood

27,866

1,940

29,806

16,711

56.1%

57

Innisfail-Sylvan Lake

22,606

1,422

24,028

13,071

54.4%

58

Lac La Biche- St. Paul

14,805

836

15,641

8,904

56.9%

59

Lacombe-Stettler

19,187

1,916

21,103

11,745

55.7%

60

Leduc

23,126

1,160

24,286

13,848

57.0%

61

Lethbridge-East

23,229

811

24,040

12,758

53.1%

62

Lethbridge-West

22,543

2,018

24,561

13,937

56.7%

63

Little Bow

18,174

597

18,771

10,636

56.7%

64

Livingstone-Macleod

23,083

1,187

24,270

10,485

43.2%

65

Medicine Hat

23,904

1,456

25,360

13,122

51.7%

66

Olds-Didsbury-Three Hills

20,211

1,180

21,391

13,107

61.3%

67

Peace River

15,604

572

16,176

5,883

36.4%

68

Ponoka-Rimbey

15,434

724

16,158

9,457

58.5%

69

Red Deer-North

20,244

1,407

21,651

8,810

40.7%

70

Red Deer-South

23,293

1,990

25,283

12,821

50.7%

71

Redwater

20,631

1,025

21,656

12,588

58.1%

72

Rocky Mountain House

19,008

1,043

20,051

11,129

55.5%

73

St. Albert

26,956

1,488

28,444

18,167

63.9%

74

Sherwood Park

30,396

1,441

31,837

20,683

65.0%

75

Spruce Grove-Sturgeon-St. Albert

22,616

1,239

23,855

14,502

60.8%

76

Stony Plain

21,946

1,722

23,668

13,714

57.9%

77

Strathmore-Brooks

23,313

1,059

24,372

11,459

47.0%

78

Vegreville-Viking

18,578

609

19,187

11,861

61.8%

79

Vermilion-Lloydminster

19,134

713

19,847

9,557

48.2%

80

Wainwright

18,823

469

19,292

10,877

56.4%

81

West Yellowhead

17,894

1,101

18,995

9,751

51.3%

82

Wetaskiwin-Camrose

21,747

1,119

22,866

12,582

55.0%

83

Whitecourt-Ste. Anne

19,420

1,042

20,462

11,078

54.1%

TOTAL

1,809,171

113,550

1,922,721

1,015,844

52.8%